Hexadecimal Sliding Clock

Show/Hide:Instructions

Introduction:

Click on any of the links at the top of the page to reveal (or hide) more information about this clock.
This clock takes inspiration from several sources: mainly the 'Flip Clocks' that were the first truly digital clocks, though long before the days of Quartz chrystals and LED's; from stacked binary clocks which admit: "Yes, It's A Clock. No, Your Mom Can't Read It"; and from Simon Hey's Rotary Word Clock

Caveats:

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At this point in time the tools on this site are entirely dependant on JavaScript. Given enough time and money it is hoped to develop a version in the future which will be able to operate independently. Since JavaScript runs on your own computer, rather than on this server, it has been possible to set up this site much more quickly than if a server-side language was used, and it is possible to serve far more pages with the available bandwidth.
If you think that you can assist with this project in any way, then please visit the Support section and leave a message.

Instructions

This clock takes a moment to synchronise each column, somewhere between 1 and 6 seconds, depending on the particular time and date.
This clock is based a demonstration of what time would look like if it was designed today, in the era of binary computers. While binary is the basis for all digital communication, binary is rather unweildy for humans, or for large numbers. The time-system that we are all familiar with is based on two different number-bases - base 12 (base 24) for hours, and base 60 for minutes and seconds. Instead, this clock is based on base 16, commonly known as Hexadecimal (often abbreviated to 'Hex') for all four units of measurement: hexHours; heximes; hexMinutes &amsp; hexSeconds.
A hexHour is exactly one and a half 'normal' hours long, and similarly a hexSecond is approximately 1.3 'normal' seconds in length.
This clock uses the system time of the computer that it is displayed on, so if will drift if your device isn't properly synchronised.
  1. Sunday
  2. Monday
  3. Tuesday
  4. Wednesday
  5. Thursday
  6. Friday
  7. Saturday
  1. 1st
  2. 2nd
  3. 3rd
  4. 4th
  5. 5th
  6. 6th
  7. 7th
  8. 8th
  9. 9th
  10. 10th
  11. 11th
  12. 12th
  13. 13th
  14. 14th
  15. 15th
  16. 16th
  17. 17th
  18. 18th
  19. 19th
  20. 20th
  21. 21st
  22. 22nd
  23. 23rd
  24. 24th
  25. 25th
  26. 26th
  27. 27th
  28. 28th
  29. 29th
  30. 30th
  31. 31st
  1. Jan
  2. Feb
  3. Mar
  4. Apr
  5. May
  6. Jun
  7. Jul
  8. Aug
  9. Sep
  10. Oct
  11. Nov
  12. Dec
  1. 2000
  2. 2001
  3. 2002
  4. 2003
  5. 2004
  6. 2005
  7. 2006
  8. 2007
  9. 2008
  10. 2009
  11. 2010
  12. 2011
  13. 2012
  14. 2013
  15. 2014
  16. 2015
  17. 2016
  18. 2017
  19. 2018
  20. 2019
  21. 2020
  22. 2021
  23. 2022
  24. 2023
  25. 2024
  26. 2025
  27. 2026
  28. 2027
  29. 2028
  30. 2029
  31. 2030
  32. 2031
  33. 2032
  34. 2033
  35. 2034
  36. 2035
  37. 2036
  38. 2037
  39. 2038
  40. 2039
  41. 2040
  42. 2041
  43. 2042
  44. 2043
  45. 2044
  46. 2045
  47. 2046
  48. 2047
  49. 2048
  50. 2049
  51. 2050
  52. 2051
  53. 2052
  54. 2053
  55. 2054
  56. 2055
  57. 2056
  58. 2057
  59. 2058
  60. 2059
  1. 0
  2. 1
  3. 2
  4. 3
  5. 4
  6. 5
  7. 6
  8. 7
  9. 8
  10. 9
  11. A
  12. B
  13. C
  14. D
  15. E
  16. F
  1. 0
  2. 1
  3. 2
  4. 3
  5. 4
  6. 5
  7. 6
  8. 7
  9. 8
  10. 9
  11. A
  12. B
  13. C
  14. D
  15. E
  16. F
  1. 0
  2. 1
  3. 2
  4. 3
  5. 4
  6. 5
  7. 6
  8. 7
  9. 8
  10. 9
  11. A
  12. B
  13. C
  14. D
  15. E
  16. F
  1. 0
  2. 1
  3. 2
  4. 3
  5. 4
  6. 5
  7. 6
  8. 7
  9. 8
  10. 9
  11. A
  12. B
  13. C
  14. D
  15. E
  16. F

© Copyright Mike Brockington 2004 - 2019   All Rights Reserved